ADD/ADHD

ADD/ADHD are conditions commonly improved using IASIS Microcurrent Neurofeedback. IASIS Microcurrent Neurofeedback bathes the brain at a micro level allowing the brain to reset or reboot. Clients report positive benefits including better nervous system regulation, more relaxation, and more balance in life.

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Teens:

What You Need to Know

Have you noticed that your child or teen finds it hard to pay attention? Do they often move around during times when they shouldn’t, act impulsively, or interrupt others? If such issues are ongoing and seem to be impacting your child’s daily life, they may have attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

ADHD can impact the social relationships and school performance of children and teens, but effective treatments are available to manage the symptoms of ADHD. Learn about ADHD, how it’s diagnosed, and how to find support.

What is ADHD?

ADHD is a developmental disorder associated with an ongoing pattern of inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity. Symptoms of ADHD can interfere with daily activities and relationships. ADHD begins in childhood and can continue into the teen years and adulthood.

What are the symptoms of ADHD?

People with ADHD experience an ongoing pattern of the following types of symptoms:

  • Inattention — having difficulty paying attention
  • Hyperactivity — having too much energy or moving and talking too much
  • Impulsivity — acting without thinking or having difficulty with self-control

Some people with ADHD mainly have symptoms of inattention. Others mostly have symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity. Some people have both types of symptoms.

Signs of inattention may include:

  • Not paying close attention to details or making seemingly careless mistakes in schoolwork or during other activities
  • Difficulty sustaining attention in play and tasks, including conversations, tests, or lengthy assignments
  • Trouble listening closely when spoken to directly
  • Finding it hard to follow through on instructions or to finish schoolwork or chores, or starting tasks but losing focus and getting easily sidetracked
  • Difficulty organizing tasks and activities, such as doing tasks in sequence, keeping materials and belongings in order, managing time, and meeting deadlines
  • Avoiding tasks that require sustained mental effort, such as homework
  • Losing things necessary for tasks or activities, such as school supplies, books, eyeglasses, and cell phones
  • Being easily distracted by unrelated thoughts or stimuli
  • Being forgetful during daily activities, such as chores, errands, and keeping appointments

Signs of hyperactivity and impulsivity may include:

  • Fidgeting and squirming while seated
  • Getting up and moving around when expected to stay seated, such as in a classroom
  • Running, dashing around, or climbing at inappropriate times or, in teens, often feeling restless
  • Being unable to play or engage in hobbies quietly
  • Being constantly in motion or on the go and/or acting as if driven by a motor
  • Talking excessively
  • Answering questions before they are fully asked or finishing other people’s sentences
  • Having difficulty waiting for one’s turn, such as when standing in line
  • Interrupting or intruding on others, for example, in conversations, games, or activities


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Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adults:

What You Need to Know

Have you experienced challenges with concentration, impulsivity, restlessness, and organization throughout your life? Have you ever wondered whether you might have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? Although ADHD is well known as a condition that affects children, many adults also experience it. ADHD can be harmful to an individual’s social relationships and work and school performance, but effective treatments are available to manage the symptoms of ADHD. Learn about the signs and symptoms of ADHD and when to discuss it with your healthcare provider.

What is ADHD?

ADHD is a developmental disorder associated with an ongoing pattern of inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity. Symptoms of ADHD can interfere with daily activities and relationships. ADHD begins in childhood and can continue into the teen years and adulthood.

What are the symptoms of ADHD?

People with ADHD experience an ongoing pattern of the following types of symptoms:

  • Inattention — having difficulty paying attention
  • Hyperactivity — having too much energy or moving and talking too much
  • Impulsivity — acting without thinking or having difficulty with self-control

Some people with ADHD mainly have symptoms of inattention. Others mostly have symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity. Some people have both types of symptoms.

Signs of inattention may include:

  • Paying close attention to details or making seemingly careless mistakes at work or during other activities
  • Sustaining attention for long tasks, such as preparing reports, completing forms, or reviewing lengthy papers
  • Listening closely when spoken to directly
  • Following instructions and finishing duties in the workplace
  • Organizing tasks and activities and managing time
  • Engaging in tasks that require sustained attention
  • Losing things such as keys, wallets, and phones
  • Being easily distracted by unrelated thoughts or stimuli
  • Being forgetful in daily activities, such as paying bills, keeping appointments, or returning calls

Signs of hyperactivity and impulsivity may include:

  • Experiencing extreme restlessness, difficulty sitting still for extended periods, and/or wearing others out with one’s activity
  • Fidgeting with or tapping hands or feet or squirming in the seat
  • Being unable to engage quietly in leisure activities
  • Talking excessively
  • Answering questions before they are asked completely
  • Talking excessively
  • Answering questions before they are fully asked or finishing other people’s sentences
  • Having difficulty waiting for one’s turn, such as when waiting in line
  • Interrupting or intruding on others

En español
Download PDF
Order a free hardcopy

Source: National Institute of Mental Health (2021). Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Retrieved December 28, 2022, from https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd

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